Why are red and white wine glasses different?

Do you need different glasses for red and white wine?

While white wines have less body and fewer intense flavors than reds, it still matters what glass you serve them in. In contrast to red wines, light-bodied wines go best in narrow-bowled glasses. … For example, fuller-bodied white wines or oaked white wines, such as Chardonnay, suit a glass with a wider bowl.

Do wine glasses really make a difference?

The wine is what matters, not the glass. The wine is what matters, not the glass. … According to Riedel, the specific shape of the glass would aid a wine drinker in picking up every aroma of the wine, and that shape would also direct the wine to the exact part of your mouth that would allow you to taste that wine best.

Why are red wine glasses different?

Red Wine Glasses

The larger bowl allows a larger wine surface to oxygen ratio that helps Pinot Noir’s aromas expand in the glass then onto the palate. As Pinot Noir isn’t very tannic, it’s fine for the wider glass design to allow a broad delivery on the palate.

Why are thin wine glasses better?

A thin wine glass is better than a thick wine glass as it transfers the flavour and the aromas of the wine more accurately from the glass to your nose and your taste buds.

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What glass do you use for red wine?

A “Bordeaux” glass is tall with a broad bowl, designed for full bodied red like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah as it directs wine to the back of the mouth. A “Burgundy” glass, on the other hand, has a bigger bowl to pick up on aromas of more delicate red wines such as Pinot Noir.