Can I use white wine vinegar instead of Chinese cooking wine?

What can I use instead of Chinese cooking wine?

The best substitutes for Shaoxing Wine / Chinese Cooking Wine are as follows:

  • Dry sherry – that’s right, just every day cheap and cheerful dry sherry;
  • Mirin – a Japanese sweet cooking wine. …
  • Cooking Sake / Japanese Rice Wine – this is a bit lighter in flavour than Chinese cooking wine, but is an acceptable substitute.

Can I use white wine vinegar instead of Chinese rice wine?

It also shares a similar flavor profile to rice vinegar, so you can easily swap it into most recipes in a pinch. However, because white wine vinegar is not quite as sweet as rice vinegar, you may want to add a bit of sugar to help match the flavor. Try substituting white wine vinegar for rice vinegar in a 1:1 ratio.

Can I use apple cider vinegar instead of Shaoxing wine?

The bottom line: If you love Asian cuisine, it’s worth keeping rice wine vinegar in your pantry. In a pinch, though, you can totally substitute in another light, mild vinegar, like apple cider vinegar or champagne vinegar.

What does Chinese cooking wine do?

Why use Chinese cooking wine in cooking? The main function of Chinese cooking wine is removing fishy smell and greasiness of food like meat and fish. The substance with fishy smell is dissolved in hot alcohol in cooking wine and taken away as the alcohol evaporates.

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What is the best cooking wine?

For cooking, you want a wine with a high acidity known in wine-speak as “crisp.” Pinot Grigio, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Blanc, and dry sparkling wines are especially good.

What does Chinese cooking wine taste like?

The most obvious answer is that it tastes delicious. Take a little sip of your Chinese cooking wine (even if it’s salted) and swirl it around your tongue. You should find sweet, sour, astringent, and umami notes, along with a rich, complex aroma.

Is mirin and Shaoxing wine the same?

Some sources will tell you that mirin is a great Shaoxing wine substitute, and it will do in a pinch if you cut the sugar out of your recipe. A better, closer choice is dry sherry (not cooking sherry). Mirin is sweeter than Shaoxing wine, which has a deep, aromatic, and slightly sweet flavor.