What kind of wine is best served with fish?

What wine goes with fish red or white?

Tradition dictates that you should always match white wine with fish, but in some cases red wine can make an ideal pairing – as can rosé. It all depends on the type of fish you’re eating and how it’s prepared. Both texture and flavour are key here.

Does red or white wine go better with seafood?

Expert Guidance, from Whites to Reds to Rosés. Pairing wine with seafood isn’t a difficult task. Think in terms of weight and substance—delicate raw fish and light, briny shellfish go best with equally delicate, light white wines.

What do you drink with fish?

Perfect Pairings: 5 Refreshing Drink Ideas to Serve With Fish

  • White Peach Sangria and Ceviche. Take advantage of peach season by making a pitcher of this white peach sangria. …
  • Sweet Tea and Grilled Seafood. …
  • Lime Margaritas and Fish Tacos. …
  • Cucumber Coolers and Chinese Cuisine. …
  • Coconut Lemonade with Coconut Crusted Shrimp.

Does chardonnay go well with seafood?

Seafood. As with chicken, seafood is always a go-to food pairing when it comes to white wines, and chardonnay is no different. Chardonnay is going to go well with butter or nutty flavors. When it comes to seafood it will pair well with seafood dishes based on shellfish like crab, lobster, shrimp, and mussels.

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What alcohol goes with fried fish?

To pair beer with food, you should match the body of a beer to the body of a dish. Fried fish fillet pairs well with a light lager, as well as with a medium-bodied beer like pale ale or red ale.

Why is white wine served with fish?

Red wines are almost always higher in tannins; their astringency can make the wine feel a bit “drying” on its own. … Meanwhile, white wine can be a better complement to fish because of its higher acidity, which I like to think of as a squirt of lemon juice to brighten the flavors of seafood.

Should dry wines always be taken before sweeter wines?

The sequence in which we taste often modifies our perceptions due to adaptations to the earlier tastes. For example, if a sweet wine is tasted before a dry wine, the dry wine’s tartness will be exaggerated by contrast with the sweetness of the wine tasted first.